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The History of Ayurveda During The Buddhist Period (300 BCE-700 CE)


Ayurvedic Guidelines for Healthy Eating: Allow Three Hours or More Between Meals


Ayurvedic Recipe: Okra Curry

 Okra has a moistening effect on the body, making it a great vegetable for balancing the dryness of Vata dosha. And since it is now the time of year when Vata is most likely to go out of balance, this recipe will help ensure your Vata dosha says moist and balanced!


Preparation time: 25 to 30 minutes

VP- K+ (balancing for Vata and Pitta, unbalancing for Kapha)

Ayurveda & Hatha Yoga

Ayurvedic Guidelines for Healthy Eating: Take Time to Rest After Meals

 “If you are like many people, after your meal is done, you are ready to get on to the next activity. This is particularly true for people with a more pitta (focused and directed) nature. To the determined pitta, resting is an uncomfortable waste of time. There are plans to make and things to do. Often the mind has wandered on to the next activity as soon as, or even just before, the last bite is taken. 

Ayurvedic Recipe: Sweet Potato Soup


Now that we’re in the season of Vata, it’s particularly important to keep vata dosha in balance. When Vata goes out of balance, dry skin, gas, constipation, insomnia, anxiety and other symptoms can result. 


Ayurveda & An Introduction to the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali


“The sage Patanjali described a path with eight (ashta) limbs (anga) in order to quiet the mind and attain yoga or reunification with the Divine. Patanjali Yoga is called both Raja Yoga (The Royal Path) and Ashtanga Yoga (The Eight Limbs). The classical Ashtanga Yoga of Patanjali should not be mixed up with the modern proprietary form of yoga called Ashtanga Yoga which was developed by Pattabhi Jois. 

Ayurvedic Guidelines for Healthy Eating: Eat Only Until You Are 75% Full


“This is one of the most important, and yet challenging, of the food guidelines for a majority of people. If you eat too much, even a good food can become toxic. Excessive food smothers the digestive fire, leading to poor digestion, a heavy feeling in the abdomen and lethargy after eating. Large meals overwhelm the ability of the body to produce digestive enzymes. The end result is the formation of ama and an increase in the kapha dosha. This is just as true for rice and vegetables as it is for pizza and hamburgers. 

Ayurvedic Recipe: Vata Seasoning - Stay Balanced During the Vata Season!


“Chef Johnny’s Vata Seasoning”


It’s time to register for Classical Ayurvedic Yoga Therapy™ Certification Course - coming to the Bahamas in March 2017!Calling a